Frazier Capital Valuation has a number of ongoing publications for both public dissemination, as well as in-house studies on various industries. These publications are based upon our years of experience in various industries throughout North America . These books provide powerful resources for potential investors to more accurately and quickly value a closely held business. A sample of our publications can be seen below.

Business Valuation Resource Guide

The Business Valuation Resource Guide is a resource of tremendous value. The book penetrates business brokerage and valuation consulting's mystique and empowers you by revealing, in layman's terms, the techniques for valuing different assets and businesses, and how to buy or sell a business. No other book on the market covers all of these issues in one source. It is packed with spreadsheets, examples, forms and checklists which can be used immediately.

You will also discover:

  • Critical value drivers for appraising and pricing any closely held business
  • How to value patents, goodwill and other intangibles
  • Industry rules of thumb and why using them is sometimes a big mistake
  • How to value fractional interests
  • Where to obtain effective resources for valuing businesses, real estate, and equipment
  • Why equipment values will radically vary depending on the value definition used
  • How to quickly analyze real estate and its contribution to value
  • Why a lease is the most important deal breaker for selling a business
  • What to remind your attorney about for drafting asset or stock sale agreements
  • Powerful tax ramifications for a stock versus an asset sale
  • When business brokers can and cannot help you
  • How seller financing makes or breaks most small business transactions
  • Buyer due diligence methods and tricks sellers use to disguise cash flows
  • How to screen buyers and sellers
  • Purchase price allocations for asset sales

Chapter 1 provides a quick overview of basic statistics and resources which will help when reviewing a company s industry, and a guide to understanding the company s life cycle and identifying its current position in the cycle.

Chapter 2 is provides a primer on basic financial statement ratio analysis, and an overview of adjustments for extraordinary and nonrecurring items. These adjustments are crucial to understand when valuing closely held businesses.

Chapter 3 presents a summary of the various approaches to valuing a business.

Chapter 4 Business Valuation (Adjusted Book Value or Cost Approach) is one of the most basic approaches to valuing a business. It is difficult to accurately adjust the balance sheet assets and liabilities to market values. This section focuses on the adjustments and nuances of making each adjustment.

Chapter 5 is about Business Valuation (Market Approach). This chapter presents the advantages and drawbacks, and dangers of using rules of thumb. This chapter gives an overview of typical rules of thumb for over 175 different businesses.

Chapter 6 Business Valuation (Income Approach) This chapter presents an overview of the different models used (cash flow to equity and to the firm), how to calculate discount rates, as well as the various assumptions which are needed to calculate a value.

Chapter 7 covers Asset Valuation (Intangible Assets). This chapter presents easy to follow techniques for quantifying many of the intangibles of a business, such as patents, trademarks and names, goodwill of a business and of certain types of real estate properties.

Chapter 8 is a primer on Asset Valuation (Real Estate).

Chapter 9 covers Asset Valuation (Equipment). After understanding this chapter, you will be able to notice how radically a balance sheet can change, based upon the definition of value, as well as being able to calculate the differences in values.

Chapter 10 covers the basics of Fractional Interests (Business Interests). This chapter will empower you to understand the mechanics of a minority discount versus a control premium when applied to business interests.

Chapter 11 covers Fractional Interests (Real Estate).

Chapter 12 covers Selling and Buying a Business: Introduction. This chapter deals with purchase offers for a business, brokers, and the motivations of both buyers and sellers.

Chapter 13 is on Buyer/Seller Due Diligence. The chapter also provides a great overview of a seller s due diligence on a buyer, as well as a handy Legal Investigation Checklist on page311 on page .

Chapter 14 covers Selling a Business: Terms and Financing. This chapter focuses on the basics of negotiating and structuring seller financing. Most importantly, the chapter provides sanity checks against rules of thumb.

Chapter 15 covers Selling a Business: Asset vs. Stock Sale. This chapter describes the impact of a stock versus an asset sale on the purchase price. While contingent liabilities are a factor, the preference of both the buyer and seller is almost always based upon tax ramifications. It also describes the mechanics of a purchase price allocation for tax purposes.

Chapter 16 covers Selling a Business: Finishing Steps. This chapter assists the reader in ensuring that the attorney addresses all of the issues, with basic tax forms needed when completing a sale, as well as an invaluable table showing the side-by-side nuances between a stock versus an asset sale in any buy-sell agreement.

Click here to purchase this book now.
Click here to view the table of contents.
Click here to view available free content online.

back to top 

Business Valuation Rules of Thumb & Formula Resource Guide

This edition will be a resource of tremendous value. The book gives you an overview of over 200
businesses. In addition, for each business, this book provides trends and general industry information,
red flags and risks, business valuation rules of thumb, basic financial ratios, typical financing in the
industry, basic equipment valuation formulas, real estate rental calculations typical in the company's
industry, resources, and much more. No other book on the market covers all of these issues in one
source. It is packed with spreadsheets, examples, forms and checklists which really work. The knowledge
you will gain from this book is powerful and explains important terms and concepts clearly.

Here you will easily understand not only how to value most businesses, but also discover:

  • How to Value a Business with Price to Sales Multiples (Actual Transactions)
  • How to Value a Business with Owner's Discretionary Cash Flow Multiples (Actual Transactions)
  • How to Value a Business with Publicly Traded Comparables
  • How to Value a Business and Separate the Real Estate From the Business Cash Flow
  • How to Account for a Business Owner who Owns Real Estate in Another Entity and Pays Himself Rent
  • How to Value a Business with Real Estate Being the Major Value
  • How to Account for a Business Owner who has a Lease Which Will Terminate Soon
  • How to Adjust for a Business Owner who Has Family Members Not Getting Paid
  • How to Account for Business Owners who Run Personal Expenses Through the Business
  • How to Adjust for a Business Owner's Excess (Shortfall) Working Capital
  • When to Adjust for a Manager's Salary
  • How to Account for Valuing Skim (Not Reporting Income)
  • Income Statement Adjustments
  • Balance Sheet Adjustments


This book is the only one of its kind which provides rules of thumb for valuing hundreds of different businesses. This book looks into hundreds of different industries found in the United States. In each section, the critical value drivers for a business are identified, along with the industry specific Red Flags and other risks related to purchasing a business that buyers should be aware of. For readers interested in learning about costs of operation, the book outlines key financial benchmarks for most of the business categories. Ratios for cost of goods sold, managers salaries, operating expenses, rent, working capital and profit margins can also be found in these sections. Of interest to many buyers will be the write-up sections of each industry which discuss available financing and typical terms for business loans. In our approximation, 50% of small businesses are purchased without financing, and most loans require a minimum down payment of +/- 30% of the purchase price. However, terms and pricing vary based upon the business type and time it was purchased. Typical rental rates are also provided for each type of business. At the end of each sections, the book provides information for further reading or reference that was useful to us in writing this manual. The chapters in this book are organized in accordance with the SIC (Standard Industrial Classification) numbers of businesses and NAICS codes.

Chapter 1 discusses the Applicability of Rules of Thumb, Weaknesses of Rules of Thumb, Value Drivers for Businesses, Attrition of Customers, Barriers to Entry, Cash Flow Analysis & Trends, Competition, Covenants not to Compete, Franchises, Geographic Location Issues, History of the Business & Prior Problems, Industry-Specific Trends, Inventory, Working Capital and Receivables, Leases, Long-Term Contracts, Macroeconomic Trends, Options to Purchase Stock or the Business, Ownership of Premises (Real Estate) and Business Valuation, Patents, Return on Investment, Sales Trends & Number of Customers, Special Permits and Licenses, Strategic Acquisition, Terms of Sale / Financing, Adjustments, Turn-Key (Absentee Owner) Business, and a Checklist of Important Items for Valuation.

Chapter 2 provides an overview of Horticulture and Animal Related Businesses.

Chapter 3 provides an overview of Construction Businesses including special trade contractors.

Chapter 4 discuses Manufacturing Businesses.

Chapter 5 provides an overview of Transportation, Sanitation and Communication Related Services Businesses.

Chapter 6 provides an overview of Wholesale and Distribution Businesses.

Chapter 7 is the largest chapter and covers a number of Retail Businesses.

Chapter 8 covers Finance, Insurance and Real Estate Related Businesses.

Chapter 9 provides an overview of different types of Business Services.

Chapter 10 provides an overview of Personal Service and Lodging Businesses.

Chapter 11 covers all Automotive Businesses.

Chapter 12 reviews Health, Education, Legal and Social Service Businesses.

Chapter 13 looks at Recreational Businesses.

Chapter 14 is an excellent primer on Buyer/Seller Due Diligence. Due diligence is the most important chapter to read and will pay for the book through the knowledge picked up after reading it.

Chapter 15 provides a great overview of Selling a Business: Terms and Financing.

Chapter 16 provides Typical Scenarios Used in Valuing Small Businesses such as items which need to be adjusted, when using rules of thumb. Important numerical examples include:how to use price to sales and owner s discretionary cash flow multiples, valuing a business with publicly traded comparables, how to separate the business value from the real estate value, how to account for skim, as well as other scenarios. Finally, the appendix presents all of the major references used with the addresses and telephone numbers for finding them.

Click here to purchase this book now.
Click here to view the table of contents.
Click here to view available free content online.

back to top 

The Valuation of Amusement Parks &
Family Entertainment Center Operations

This edition will be a resource of tremendous value. The book penetrates the amusement park industry's
mystique and empowers you by revealing, in layman's terms, the techniques for valuing amusement
park businesses and their assets. No other book on the market covers all of these issues in one
source. It is packed with spreadsheets, examples, forms and checklists which really work. The knowledge
you will gain from this book is powerful. The book explains important terms and concepts clearly.
Here you will easily understand not only how to value, sell or purchase any family entertainment center,
but also discover:

  • The Amusement Park Industry Profile
  • Family Entertainment Associations
  • Vital Demographic Statistics for the Family Entertainment Center
  • Typical Revenue and Expense Streams of Amusement Parks
  • Typical Demand Factors for Amusement Parks
  • How to Find Direct and Indirect Competitors
  • Construction Trends in Family Entertainment Centers
  • The Nuances of an Amusement Park's Revenue Streams and Expenses
  • How to Analyze a Family Entertainment Center's Financial Statements
  • Compare an Amusement Park's Financial Ratios to the Industry
  • Family Entertainment Business Valuation Rules of Thumb
  • Valuing the Real Estate of Amusement Parks
  • Typical Equipment and Start up Costs for Family Entertainment Centers
  • Typical Equipment Installation Costs for Amusement Parks
  • Business Acquisition Rates of Return
  • Real Estate Cap Rates for Various Amusement Parks
  • Red Flags to Watch out for

Chapter 1 is an Overview of the Family Entertainment Center Industry. This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the family entertainment center industry and the rapid changes which are taking place in this industry. This chapter focuses on the History, Industry Profile & Focus, Revenue Streams, Suppliers of Amusement Goods, Family Entertainment Demand, Demographics of Amusement Attendees, Competition from Every Type of Entertainment, Risks of Injury and the Regulatory Environment of the Industry.

Chapter 2 talks about Analyzing a Family Entertainment Center s Financial Statements. In this chapter the reader is provided a primer on basic financial statement ratio analysis, and an overview of adjustments for extraordinary and nonrecurring items. Although not as critical for larger businesses, these adjustments are crucial to understand when valuing closely held businesses. These are discussed in Adjustments for Extraordinary and Nonrecurring Items on page 67. Finally, the addendum presents an invaluable Checklist of Important Items for Family Entertainment Valuations on page 72.

Chapter 3 presents a Summary of Business Valuation Approaches. This chapter presents a summary of the various approaches to valuing a family entertainment business. More importantly it presents an overview of which valuation technique is most useful, when comparing the values during a reconciliation.

Chapter 4 is solely about Business Valuation. One of the most basic approaches to valuing a family entertainment business is by looking at the balance sheet. It is difficult to accurately adjust the balance sheet assets and liabilities to market values. This section focuses on the adjustments and nuances of making each adjustment. Chapter 4 also presents one of the most typically used methods for establishing the value of a family entertainment business. The market approach is used frequently, because it is the easiest technique to understand. Most people understand multiples from the stock market as well as rules of thumb. This chapter presents the advantages and drawbacks, and dangers of using rules of thumb. With respect to the income approach to valuing a business, this chapter is one of the most important chapters in the book. All decisions are based upon cash flow, the most critical element to a family entertainment s business value.

Chapter 5 discusses Asset Valuation (Real Estate). Real estate may sometimes constitute the largest component within the fixed asset category on a balance sheet. This chapter gives a critical primer in what to look for when accounting for the real estate asset or lease, as part of a family entertainment business acquisition or valuation. This chapter addresses the different types of family entertainments, the leases, and typical methods of valuing the asset.

Chapter 6 discusses Asset Valuation (Equipment). Every business is sold with equipment. However, knowing how much the machinery and equipment are worth will assist the purchaser in determining the amount of goodwill that a buyer would pay for as part of the overall purchase price. These assets are different from real estate and intangibles, because their values can differ depending upon the specific circumstances under which they are being sold, e.g., liquidation value, going concern value. Sometimes the installation costs can be higher than the liquidation value. After understanding this chapter, you will be able to notice how radically a balance sheet can change, based upon the definition of value, as well as being able to calculate the differences in values. The Appendix presents all of the major references used with their addresses and telephone numbers, and specific definitions.

Click here to purchase this book now.
Click here to view the table of contents.
Click here to view available free content online.

back to top 

The Valuation of Liquor Store Operations

This edition will be a resource of tremendous value. The book penetrates the retail liquor industry's
mystique and empowers you by revealing, in layman's terms, the techniques for valuing retail liquor
store businesses and their assets. No other book on the market covers all of these issues in one
source. It is packed with spreadsheets, examples, forms and checklists which really work. The knowledge
you will gain from this book is powerful. The book explains important terms and concepts clearly.
Here you will easily understand not only how to value, sell or purchase any liquor store but also discover:

  • Liquor Distribution Channels
  • Licensing Requirements for each State
  • How to Value Liquor Licenses
  • Construction Trends in Liquor Stores
  • The Nuances of a Liquor Store's Revenue Streams and Expenses
  • How to Analyze a Liquor Store's Financial Statements
  • Compare a Liquor Store's Financial Ratios to the Industry
  • Liquor Store Business Valuation Rules of Thumb
  • Valuing the Real Estate of Liquor Stores
  • Typical Equipment for Various Liquor Stores
  • Typical Equipment Installation Costs for Liquor Stores
  • Business Acquisition Rates of Return
  • Real Estate Cap Rates for Various Liquor Stores
  • How Skim works in the Liquor Store Industry
  • Red Flags to Watch out for

Chapter 1 provides an Overview of the Liquor Store Industry and the rapid changes which are taking place in this industry. This chapter focuses on the history, trends, demand of alcoholic beverages, supply from distributors, Sunday sales and wine tastings, taxes, competition, revenue streams from various beverages, risks in the industry and the regulatory environment of the industry.

Chapter 2 looks at Financial Statements & Operations. In this chapter the reader is provided a primer on basic financial statement ratio analysis, and an overview of adjustments for extraordinary and nonrecurring items. Although not as critical for larger businesses, these adjustments are crucial to understand when valuing closely held businesses. These are discussed in Adjustments for Extraordinary and Nonrecurring Items on page 63. Finally, the addendum presents an invaluable Checklist of Important Items for Liquor Store Valuations on page 69.

Chapter 3 provides a Summary of Business Valuation Approaches. This chapter presents a summary of the various approaches to valuing a business. More importantly it presents an overview of which valuation technique is most useful when comparing the values during a reconciliation.

Chapter 4 provides a Liquor Store Business Valuation. One of the most basic approaches to valuing a business is by examining the balance sheet. It is difficult to accurately adjust the balance sheet assets and liabilities to market values. This section focuses on the adjustments and nuances of making each adjustment. Chapter 4 presents one of the most typically used methods for establishing the value of a liquor store business. The market approach is used frequently, because it is the easiest technique to understand. Most people understand multiples from the stock market as well as rules of thumb. This chapter presents the advantages and drawbacks, and dangers of using rules of thumb. With respect to the income approach to valuing a business, this chapter is one of the most important ones in the book. All decisions are based upon cash flow, the most critical element to the value of a liquor store s business value.

Chapter 5 looks at a Liquor Store Asset Valuation (Real Estate). Real estate may sometimes constitute the largest component within the fixed asset category on a balance sheet. This chapter gives a critical primer in what to look for accounting for the real estate asset or lease, as part of a liquor store business acquisition or valuation. This chapter addresses the different types of liquor stores, the leases, and typical methods of valuing the asset.

Chapter 6 looks at a Liquor Store Asset Valuation (Equipment). Every business is sold with equipment. However, knowing how much the machinery and equipment are worth will assist the purchaser in determining the amount of goodwill that a buyer would pay as part of the overall purchase price. These assets are different from real estate and intangibles, because their values can differ depending upon the specific circumstances under which they are being sold, e.g., liquidation value, going concern value. Sometimes the installation costs can be higher than the liquidation value. After understanding this chapter, you will be able to notice how radically a balance sheet can change, based upon the definition of value, as well as being able to calculate the differences in values. The appendix presents all of the major references used with the addresses, telephone numbers, and websites for finding them, and specific definitions and a glossary for different valuations (business, real estate, and machinery and equipment).

Click here to purchase this book now.
Click here to view the table of contents.
Click here to view available free content online.

back to top 

The Valuation of Movie Theater Operations

This edition will be a resource of tremendous value. The book penetrates the movie industry's
mystique and empowers you by revealing, in layman’s terms, the techniques for valuing theater
businesses and their assets. No other book on the market covers all of these issues in one source.
It is packed with spreadsheets, examples, forms and checklists which really work. The knowledge
you will gain from this book is powerful and explains important terms and concepts clearly.
Here you will easily understand not only how to value, sell or purchase any theater but also discover:

  • Movie Distribution Channels
  • Construction Trends in Theaters
  • How Film Distribution, Negotiations and Licensing Really Work
  • Film Licensing & Pricing Formulas
  • The Nuances of a Theater's Revenue Streams and Expenses
  • How to Analyze a Theater's Financial Statements
  • Compare a Theater's Ratios to the Industry
  • Theater Valuation Rules of Thumb
  • Analyzing Cash Flows for Single Operations versus Multiple Location Theaters
  • How IMAX, Mega and Multi-Plex Theaters Differ in Facilities
  • Valuing the Real Estate of Theaters and the Nuances which can Drastically Affect Value
  • How many Screens and Seats should a Theater have?
  • What Changes are Likely to Happen in the next Five to Eight Years
  • Typical Equipment for Various Theaters
  • How the Equipment can Make or Break an Operation
  • Understanding Auditorium Layouts, Sound and Projection Systems
  • Typical Installation Costs for New Theaters
  • Business Acquisition Rates of Return
  • Real Estate Cap Rates for Various Theater Types

This book is the only one of its kind which describes the valuation of a Movie Theater's Business, Real Estate and Equipment.

Chapter 1 is an Overview of the industry and provides a comprehensive overview of the theater industry and the rapid changes which are taking place in this industry. This chapter focuses on the History, Trends, Movie Theater Demand, Supply of Quality First Run Films, Current Renovation Trends of Facilities, Movie Distribution Channels, Film Negotiations and Licensing Competition, Revenue Streams in Relation to DVDs, Risks in the Industry and the Regulatory Environment of the Industry.

Chapter 2 walks you through Analyzing a Theater's Financial Statements & Operations. In this chapter the reader is provided a primer on basic financial statement ratio analysis, and an overview of adjustments for extraordinary and nonrecurring items. Although not as critical for larger businesses, these adjustments are crucial to understand when valuing closely held businesses. These are discussed in Adjustments for Extraordinary and Nonrecurring Items on page 82. Finally, the addendum presents an invaluable Checklist of Important Items for Theater Valuations on page 87.

Chapter 3 provides a Summary of Business Valuation Approaches. This chapter presents a summary of the various approaches to valuing a business. More importantly it presents an overview of which valuation technique is most useful when comparing the values during a reconciliation.

Chapter 4 discusses Business Valuation (Adjusted Book Value or Cost Approach). One of the most basic approaches to valuing a business is by looking at the balance sheet. It is difficult to accurately adjust the balance sheet assets and liabilities to market values. This section focuses on the adjustments and nuances of making each adjustment.

Chapter 5 discusses Business Valuation (Market Approach). Chapter 5 presents one of the most typically used methods for establishing the value of a theater business. The market approach is used frequently, because it is the easiest technique to understand. Most people understand multiples from the stock market as well as rules of thumb. This chapter presents the advantages and drawbacks, and dangers of using rules of thumb.

Chapter 6 discusses Business Valuation (Income Approach). This chapter is one of the most important chapters in the book. All decisions are based upon cash flow, the most critical element to a theater s business value. This chapter presents an overview of the different models used (cash flow to equity and to the firm), how to calculate discount rates, as well as the various assumptions which are needed to calculate a value. Finally, an excellent example of two different models is presented in Table 6-11 on page 150 and in Table 6-16 on page 156.

Chapter 7 provides a good overview of Asset Valuation (Real Estate). Real estate may sometimes constitute the largest component within the fixed asset category on a balance sheet. This chapter gives a critical primer in what to look for when analyzing the real estate asset or lease. This chapter addresses the different types of movie theaters, the leases, and typical methods of valuing the asset.

Chapter 8 provides a good overview of Theater Asset Valuation (Equipment). Every business is sold with equipment. However, knowing how much the machinery and equipment are worth will assist the purchaser in determining the amount of goodwill that a buyer would pay for as part of the overall purchase price. These assets are different from real estate and intangibles, because their values can differ depending upon the specific circumstances under which they are being sold, e.g., liquidation value, going concern value. The Appendix presents all of the major references used with their addresses and telephone numbers.

Click here to purchase this book now.
Click here to view the table of contents.
Click here to view available free content online.

back to top 

The Valuation of Auto &
Recreational Vehicle Dealership Operations

This edition will be a resource of tremendous value. The book penetrates the dealership industry's mystique and empowers you by revealing, in layman's terms, the techniques for valuing automotive and recreational vehicle dealership businesses and their assets. No other book on the market covers all of these issues in one source. It is packed with spreadsheets, examples, forms and checklists which really work. The knowledge you will gain from this book is powerful. The book explains important terms and concepts clearly. Here you will easily understand not only how to value, sell or purchase any RV or auto dealership, but you will also discover:

  • Franchising Agreements with Vehicle Manufacturers
  • Service and Parts Sales Trends
  • Typical Revenue and Expense Margins for Auto and RV Dealers
  • Trade Organizations
  • How to Analyze a Dealer's Financial Statements
  • Compare a Dealer's Financial Ratios to the Industry
  • How LIFO Reserves Affect Inventory Value
  • Dealership Business Valuation Rules of Thumb
  • Valuing the Real Estate of Dealerships
  • Typical Equipment and Start up Costs for Dealerships
  • Typical Equipment Installation Costs for Dealerships
  • Business Acquisition Rates of Return
  • Real Estate Cap Rates for Various Dealerships
  • Red Flags to Watch out for
  • And much more

Chapter 1 provides an Overview of the Auto and RV Dealership Industry. This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the auto dealership industry and the rapid changes which are taking place in this industry. This chapter will focus on the history, trends, new and used car demand, supply of new vehicles, current renovation trends of facilities, automobile distribution channels and licensing competition, revenue streams in relation to service departments and sale of automobiles and, risks in the industry and the regulatory environment of the industry.

Chapter 2 Analyzes a Dealership's Financial Statements & Operations. In this chapter the reader is provided a primer on basic financial statement ratio analysis, and an overview of adjustments for extraordinary and nonrecurring items. Although not as critical for larger businesses, these adjustments are crucial to understand when valuing closely held businesses. These are discussed in Table 2-23 on page 74. Finally, the addendum presents an invaluable Checklist of Important Items for Dealership Valuations on page 76.

Chapter 3 provides a Summary of Business Valuation Approaches. This chapter presents a summary of the various approaches to valuing a business. More importantly it presents an overview of which valuation technique is most useful, when comparing the values during a reconciliation.

Chapter 4 covers the Business Valuation of Auto/RV Dealerships. One of the most basic approaches to valuing a business is by looking at the balance sheet. It is challenging to accurately adjust the balance sheet s assets and liabilities to market values. This section focuses on the adjustments and nuances of making each adjustment. The market approach is one of the most typical methods used for establishing the value of an auto dealership business. The market approach is used frequently, because it is the easiest technique to understand. Most people understand multiples from the stock market as well as rules of thumb. This chapter also presents the advantages and drawbacks, and dangers of using rules of thumb. With respect to the income approach to valuing a business, this chapter is one of the most important sections in the book. All decisions are based upon cash flow, the most critical element to an auto or RV dealership s business value.

Chapter 5 discusses Asset Valuation for RV and Auto Dealerships (Real Estate). Real estate may sometimes constitute the largest component within the fixed asset category on a balance sheet. This chapter gives a critical primer in what to look for when accounting for the real estate asset or lease, as part of a dealership business acquisition or valuation. This chapter addresses the different types of auto dealerships, the leases, and typical methods of valuing the assets.

Chapter 6 discusses Auto and RV Dealership Asset Valuation (Equipment). Every business is sold with equipment. However, knowing how much the machinery and equipment are worth will assist the purchaser in determining the amount of goodwill that a buyer would pay for as part of the overall purchase price. These assets are different from real estate and intangibles, because their values can differ depending upon the specific circumstances under which they are being sold, e.g., liquidation value, going concern value. Sometimes the installation costs can be higher than the liquidation value. After understanding this chapter, you will be able to notice how radically a balance sheet can change, based upon the definition of value, as well as being able to calculate the differences in equipment values. The appendix presents all of the major references used with their addresses, websites where available, and telephone numbers.

Click here to purchase this book now.
Click here to view the table of contents.
Click here to view available free content online.

back to top 

Home | About Us | Contact Us | Valuation Services | Testimonials | Publications | Tutorials | Valuation Disciplines
Copyright © 2010 Frazier Capital, All rights reserved. CSS Menu by OpenCube.